Ray Kostuk

I first met Steve in 1986 at the OSA topical meeting on holography in Hawaii. I was in the process of finishing my graduate degree and remember being a bit nervous about my presentation. More »

Andy Pepper

Steve came to visit us in Nottingham on one of his numerous trips to the UK. We played tourist, drank beer in the oldest pub in the world, looked at art (Henry Moore at Nottingham Castle), explored cafés and spent an afternoon chatting about a great deal, and very little about holography. More »

Kaveh Bazargan

I first met Steve Benton in 1979, on my first trip to the US. Steve was one of the ‘gods’ of holography, and I went to pay homage at the Polaroid labs. I was a student, and quite nervous about meeting him. More »

Graham Saxby

One thing Steve and I shared was a fondness for English bitter ale. On one occasion when we were both in Bath and met at the RPS headquarters, we spent a long and happy afternoon in the nearby Moon and Sixpence engaged in a lengthy discussion, More »

Jonathan Ross

I first met Steve Benton in 1978, shortly after becoming involved with holography. I was on a photoshoot for Multiplex-style holograms and had been persuaded that it would make an amusing image if I shaved off half my beard More »

Jerry Pethick* (1935–2003)

Artist, holographer, and inventor of the sand table as a way to make holograms.

deem-photoRebecca Deem
redeem75@yahoo.com

About the author
Rebecca first saw holograms at an art gallery in 1970 while completing an Art supervision degree. In 1988, she received the Shearwater Foundation Art Holography Award. In 1995 with partner Fred Unterseher, she co-founded Zone Holografix Studios, an art and teaching studio with a pulse laser lab. She continues to exhibit artwork, teach and write for electronic and print publications.

More »

Erratum: Practical Holography – third edition

Author: Graham Saxby

There is an omission in the formula at the top of page 471. After the ferric sulphate line, add a new line as follows: ‘sodium hydrogen sulfate, crystals…30 g’. Graham offers his apologies to any holographers whose bleach stage took three hours as a result of this omission.

The impossible holographic object

blyth-photoJeff Blyth
jeff@biotech.cam.ac.uk

About the author
After graduating in 1973 in Applied Chemistry he worked in a company with dichromated gelatin, unrelated to holography. In ’77, he was amazed to see a holographic pendant made using the very material he was researching. His life ‘changed for ever’. He subsequently worked on photopolymer materials for Ilford, which became the subject for an MPhil at Wolverhampton Polytechnic. Since ’91 he has been involved in ‘blue sky’ research at the Institute of Biotechnology in Cambridge, UK. Jeff is the recipient of the Royal Photographic Society’s Saxby award for 2003
(http://www.holography.co.uk/events/saxbyaward/jeffblyth/jeff.htm).

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SPIE Practical Holography Conference 2004*

Rebecca DeemRebecca Deem
redeem75@yahoo.com

About the author
Rebecca first saw holograms at an art gallery in 1970 while completing an Art supervision degree. In 1988, she received the Shearwater Foundation Art Holography Award. In 1995 with partner Fred Unterseher, she co-founded Zone Holografix Studios, an art and teaching studio with a pulse laser lab. She continues to exhibit artwork, teach and write for electronic and print publications.

More »

Some uses for everyday items in holography

John Pecora
holograms3d@yahoo.com

About the author
John Pecora is a computer specialist and a certified Microsoft Systems Engineer. He made his first holograms using a sandbox holography kit in 1980. He has worked for holographic companies making photoresist holograms for embossing. He is now an amateur holographer fabricating his own DCG emulsions. He has always liked reverse engineering, and enjoys taking an idea from concept to final product.

More »



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